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Video Interview. Learn from the former UFC Director of Social Media on the importance of your MMA social media game.

lee profile image Lee James Wynne Updated on ・23 min read

Hey everyone! Welcome to thisMMAlife 🥋🤼‍♀️🥊🧘🏽🙏🏼 ! We are the fastest growing MMA community on earth 😎

Today we have a great interview with Randall Faehnrich from Prolific Media who worked as the Director of Social Media for the UFC for 5 years! Randy now works with UFC athletes such as Francis Ngannou providing critical advice and services on building social media and digital presence.

Learn about the importance of social media, how it was received in the UFC and what Randy wants to achieve with MMA athletes through the 5 years experience he gained in social at the UFC, plus what Dana White was like to work with! Link in Bio.

It is well worth a watch, plus you can read the transcript below.

We are the only MMA community that is progressive, constructive and non-toxic. We don't write clickbait or BS content just for views.

thisMMAlife is all about empowering the MMA community, sharing knowledge and helping each other grow. So if you want to get involved, hit the sign-in button and share your knowledge and stories, maybe you can inspire the next generation of MMA enthusiasts.

Randy has worked with some of the biggest stars of the UFC 🔥

He is worth listening to and making contact with if you are passionate about your social media and digital presence. We will be continuing this theme of empowering MMA athletes with their social media presence in the future, so stay tuned.

Interview transcript 👇🏼

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Hey Randy! Thanks for joining us at thisMMAlife. It's an absolute pleasure to have you here. Let me tell you what you probably don't know is how I first came across your name. It was probably about two or three years ago, I was watching UFC fight pass and I was watching UFC embedded. I can't remember the exact episode that it was on, but your face appeared on screen and then below it had your tag on Twitter and it basically said that you were, the at the time a UFC social media organizer or director something along those lines. I don't exactly remember the title that you had there, but I took a note of it and I added it into my tasks to eventually sort of see if I could get you to join us on and give a really good overview of what you do, because it seems like such a massive, important part of the MMA business. So I wanted to start with first was just for you to tell us what you did for the UFC. Your background. Who you are. Your sort of day to day life force there if you don't mind?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah, No worries. So I currently live in Las Vegas. I went to school at UNLV, which is a university here in Las Vegas and graduated with a degree in journalism but I worked at a local paper here in Las Vegas for a while. One of the things that I was doing as a reporter was also handling the social media for the paper and you know, the editor at the time was an older woman, and she wasn't too familiar with social media. This is 2013/14. I wasn't too familiar with social media and they asked if I knew how to do it, I was like, Well, yeah, you know, I'm 20 something, social media is what grew up with, so I started doing social as part of my job as a journalist, reporting and then shooting out these articles and you know, posting and creating graphics etc. So about a year goes by and I see this job posting for the UFC, it was for a social media coordinator position. I had a friend actually that I went to college with who was working in PR at the UFC, she told me, you know "Hey, I think you'd be really good at this". I was like, well... I only do social media a little bit in my current job. I'm really a journalist and I was very set on being a journalist because I always admired journalists. I like writing.

So long story short, I went for it and ended up getting the position. So I started out as just a social media coordinator for the UFC and over the years, you know, obviously worked my way up to director of social for the UFC. The day to day tasks are very robust. It's not always just posting on Instagram or sending out a tweet. You know, there's a lot of things that are involved in the UFC, creating a plan of attack for social media, especially with a huge corporation like the UFC. Not only are we creating a blueprint or a footprint, I should say for UFC in the USA, we have several regional accounts. So there's UFC, Brazil. There's UFC, Europe. There's UFC, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Latin America etc. So it's working hand in hand with those people in those markets as well, making sure that all of us sound kind of the same as far as that what our plan is. Um, And then obviously you know, doing the day to day tasks with the athletes or with the UFC staff, whether it's athlete photography, videography, editing, um, you know, putting together decks, presenting etc. So that was kind of what I did for almost five years at the UFC. You know, week after week, event after event, it's why it was such a great time.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
It sounds like it, five years is a long time, right? I mean, a five-year stint do social media for an organization like the UFC.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah, it was, it was a very long time, but it was a very quick learning curve and six months later, the company was acquired. So yeah. There was a series of restructures that happened and so it was very much like getting hired into a full team and then having to rebuild within six months. And so there was a very quick learning curve. It was very much trial by fire, if you will, you know, like having to learn on the fly. But it was such a great time. It was a great time and it was an amazing great learning experience. Being in social media and watching the rise of the company during that time and making some of those really important connections.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Well, I should imagine. I mean, I did you know much about the UFC before you saw that job? I mean, was that like going for your ultimate dream job at the time?

[Prolific Media]
Oh, yeah. No, it was, honestly, it was a dream job of mine. I was a big boxing fan growing up, I think, Like most, I would say, like most MMA fans probably around my age. I don't know. Maybe that's not true. But I was a huge boxing fan. You know, Whittaker, Delahoya, Mayweather, you know, I grew up watching those guys. Castillo Corrales that those kinds of fights, yeah. I mean, I remember... You know, I'm sure, like most MMA fans watching the ultimate fighter season one with Forrest Griffin and Stephan Bonnar. But I kind of like most of the fans. I kind of watched it, it was kind of cool and then forgot about it.

Then later, it was Jose Aldo and Uriah Faber when I saw Jose throwing those low kicks and kicking Faber and Faber unable to walk, I was like, Woah, this is legal? You could do this in this sport? This is crazy so I started watching a lot more and as time went on, I kept up with MMA and the UFC, but I wasn't like a mega fan or anything initially so when I saw this job posting, it wasn't a dream job of mine it was more just like it would be kind of cool. It would be cool to get in on this MMA scene and be a part of it but during my time there, it became a dream job, it was amazing, you know? Good work. The sport was amazing. The athletes were amazing.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
I guess that was round about the time of the emergence of Conor McGregor in the UFC as well, right?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah so when I came in, like, right after I would say was when Conor Mcgregor exploded, which was, in my opinion, around the Conor McGregor v Mendez fight. Yeah, and then I got hired, like the same weekend is UFC 194 So, Conor McGregor v Jose Aldo, but I didn't work that event. So I came in right as that rocket ship was taking off, taking on the experience Conor McGregor had, everybody has to, so yeah, it was crazy.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
So did you get to work with lots of the athletes directly?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah. So I think one of the things that are maybe not quite understood about social is the hands-on activity, especially with the UFC athletes. I know in a lot of sports, you don't get as much hands-on activity with athletes and direct contact, but the UFC is a little bit different, I will say this against any sport, MMA has the nicest athletes out of any sport that you'll ever meet. I know that's crazy. It sounds crazy cause they fight for a living.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
No, it doesn't. I know what you mean. MMA fighters are so nice, you know, They're amazing people.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
So nice.. So I had a lot of direct contact with a lot of the athletes in the UFC, whether we shoot funny videos, serious videos, you know, doing a Q&A etc, it was a good time.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Can you name drop some of the biggest UFC stars that you work with directly?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
You could just name anybody. And the answer is yes.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
I know that you're already working with Francis Ngannou, right? But people like, um, people like Jon Jones. Tyron Woodley?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Amanda Nunes, Jon Jones, Tyron Woodley, yeah, I mean, everybody. And you know, social media is not at the top of everybody's priority list when they're going through a fight week, you know, check-in day or media day, but always, you know, part of the thing was that the team and I always, you know, wanted to make known is that we wanted to build report with the UFC athletes. We wanted them to come to do social media stuff with us. We don't want to be pushy or annoying, or hey, make this or that you know, use this emoji or do this tik tok or whatever. We wanted them to know that we understand that there's a lot going on this weekend.

If you have to reschedule, can't make time for us. Cool, will be in the background doing our thing over here. But if we can get that time, you know we'll make most of it. And I think we built a pretty good rapport with the UFC athletes in that way.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Yeah, I heard that quite a few times. I mean, I remember seeing and hearing a few people talk about what sort of social media workshops that we're always available to the UFC athletes, you know. So if any point they wanted to learn more about Twitter, for example, and the Twitter demographic, what would appeal to their audience etc, that was always available to them from the UFC perspective, which is really valuable. And, you know, when you hear a lot of the conversations like you know what's happening today around salary and also all sorts of different things. And then you look up the social media profile of somebody like Jorge Masvidal, for example, and it's huge! Yeah, I mean, it's really good to see that that the UFC and people like yourself have had such a big impact with UFC athletes like on that and that they have been able to fully embrace, you know, the benefits that large online presence is brilliant. It's so important.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah and that's something way told them. When I was at the UFC a lot of guys and girls, you know, would kind of dismiss it. But there were some UFC athletes that kind of really sat down and were like, yeah, this is a thing because it's not just social media, right? It's an awareness platform. It's a platform to build trust and loyalty, engage an audience that is going to be, you know, really loyal to you. If you do it the right way, your audience, in turn, pay for your products, subscribe to your service, etc

So, um, it's awesome to see a lot of these athletes from when we first began to now and to see how their YouTube channel has grown over Instagram or their Facebook, where they're selling their own products and you know it's still there's still a lot of work to be done for the MMA athlete in particular now, and they want to understand their impact on social and what they have and that's kind of why, you know, I started doing what I'm doing now, but it's good to see that they have grown since 2015 to today.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Absolutely! We will get around to Prolific Media in a bit because I'm really interested because the way that I see that is almost like you've got this amazing experience and background in terms of working with the biggest promotion out there and you can take all of that and just apply it to anybody that's willing to learn and to work with you from a partnership perspective to grow continuously.

It sounds like an amazing company, to begin with, and it sounds like a great idea to get started, that is one of the reasons why, why I wanted to interview you because one of the things that we're all about here at thisMMAlife is just trying to empower the MMA community as much as possible.

Even if that is just the beginning, you know, you've got this young kid coming through, just winning on the local scene, but they've got this huge ambition and desire inside of them. If you can get to them early enough and you can get working with them early enough, then they will be 100 times more aware of their social media branding and knowing what they need to do on the business side of things.

So from an MMA perspective, Are you training MMA now?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
No, I wouldn't say I trained MMA. No, but I do train a bit, I'm building a little home gym in the garage. I have a bag and jump rope, mat flooring etc. My brother actually trains quite a bit specifically with jiu-jitsu, he's a very lanky, tall, long guy. Probably weighs in 100 pounds soaking wet. But I mean he just whoops my ass on those mats. I'll do a little pad work here and there. But no, I wouldn't say I trained MMA. I hit mitts once in a while with him and again I'll do some stuff on the heavy bag. MMA, it's such a great workout, it's a good release for your mind.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Just a hobbyist? Yes. I know what you're saying. I often think of it like this and I know a lot of other people say it that it's problem-solving to a degree at the physical plane, because if you're inside of your head all the time, you know, continuously working through problems at the mental level, then you know that's just having this release to be able to do at the physical level as well.

Cool. Okay, so onto Prolific Media, tell us all about your new company!

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah. So, again, obviously, I have this extensive experience from the UFC. I've worked with these athletes for so long on and I got to know quite a few of them, you know, pretty well. And you know one thing about the UFC, and everything they do is great, but the one thing is that a lot of the time athletes (even big-name athletes) if they're not in the main event or on the main card, they can't always get their exposure and coverage because the machine just moves so fast, Right?

It's 42 events a year in the UFC, 12 to 14 fights on a card. There is a lot of stuff going on and as part the UFC, your job is to promote the event as a whole, highlights a couple of people, move on highlighted more etc and in doing that you don't really get to promote people that deserve it or create the exposure for people that really need it. So I started prolific media because of that, a number of things really.. Number one though is, you know, the lack of exposure and awareness for some of the top UFC athletes in the sport, you look at people in the top of the featherweight division, lightweight division, strong weight, etc and you look at their social footprint and sometimes it's non-existent and it's not that engaging. These people should be at the top of every list of every product that is relevant to their market.

Number two is the amount of revenue that's being left on the table for these guys. As we kind of briefly touched on there is that rift between fighter pay and the people at the top of the UFC and it's been going on for a long time. So my goal with prolific media is to give these athletes another source of revenue, whether it be from Facebook, ad breaks, whether it be from YouTube views and YouTube revenue.. I mean there are multiple ways to make money on social media and you see that with a lot of guys at the top of their game right now. Jorge Masvidal hasn't been active but his YouTube channel is doing crazy numbers and Wonderboy Thompson doing crazy YouTube numbers. You know? You wanna be very active and attract a lot of sponsors on your Instagram and stuff like that. There are other ways to make money, but not everybody kind of understands how to do it, you know? So that's the second reason.

Number three is, these athletes, unlike every other actor on the planet, they have to go into actual combat, right? You have to enter an octagon and fight somebody. So the last thing you're thinking about during fight week is "what should I post on my Instagram?" I mean, you have a ton of media obligations, UFC obligations. But yet it is a critical time for social media exposure.

So for me, it's a way to unload something off of their plate, right? Because this is what I get told from the athletes all the time and if any of them watch or read this, they're gonna know exactly what I am talking about. The most exposure you're going to have is from that Tuesday to Saturday when you fight, that is, that is when all eyes are on you, whether it's the top of the card of the bottom of the card, because the UFC is back in your life and the media's back, everything is about your fight that week but for most athletes during that week social is not a priority for them.

So it's like, Hey! let Prolific Media offload this from your plate. We will handle all the editing, handle all the posting, all the photography, videography, social content and pipeline etc. And so that's kind of why I started Prolific Media and Prolific Medi is not just an MMA brand management group, we are talking to athletes and other sports brands, podcast businesses, but I come from the MMA space, and I know personally what these athletes go through and I know how much money they can be making and I know a lot of them have a hard time in between fights and in between fight camps so I wanted to start in the MMA bubble because I think these MMA athletes deserve so much more and can have so much more, they just need a little bit of guidance and a little bit of a push when it comes to their social digital footprint. And that's kind of why I started Prolific Media.

[Lee @ thismmalife]
Amazing. It sounds absolutely fantastic. And for anybody that doesn't know, it would is it fair to say that the highest-profile client that you currently have this Francis Ngannou right?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah, pretty much. I mean, it was a product of timing, opportunity and preparation, you know? It was just a perfect storm and Francis has been, you know, so amazing when I was at UFC. I met Francis at the UFC PI, almost every day, if not every day. And there were times where I'd be eating lunch in the UFC PI cafeteria and Francis would just come to sit down and say What's up? He'd ask about social media, then this question, that question. You know, Francis Ngannou likes photography, he likes drones, he likes video and editing, and he's very technologically savvy in that regard and so he always just has loads of questions for me and question the question that we always spoke on DSO when we linked up back in what was the January or February went to dinner and I kind of had a conversation about it. It was just opportunity meeting preparation, and the timing was so we started working together.

So, yeah, Francis's is definitely our biggest client. It's been amazing and watching his footprint, his social and digital footprint grow in these last three months has been awesome.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
I've seen some of the amazing videos on Instagram, it's not just what's going on from a skills perspective, it's just that you've got Francis who is enormous, and then you've got, forget his name um, the young boxer. King?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
What was his name? Were you talking about the boxer that he's been Social media posts with? Ryan, Ryan Garcia, King, Ryan Garcia. That's right!

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
So you've just got these two separations of skills. The fact that you see them both on the same Social Media post doing this and the comparison in size is unbelievable, you know, on the skills that he shows off, from a boxing perspective and he's hitting Francis to the body, and then he's doing all the hand-eye coordination with a speedball and stuff. I think that's a series in itself, that's the feeling that I get from it, I'm feeling like I am watching a small miniseries to a degree, and I'm looking forward to seeing the next one rather than just seeing a random post.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
You know man, it looks like they've got good chemistry as well. So yeah, it is. It's really good stuff. Yeah, that was a great time and Ryan was so hospitable and you know just awesome to work with him. Francis had a great time hitting the heavy bag, hitting the speedball, the little double-sided bag. The body contact was great. So yeah, it was a good time.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
So, hypothetically speaking, if I'm an MMA athlete today, let's say I've got maybe 8,000 15,000 followers on Instagram or Twitter and I'm you know, I'm on the MMA circuit, I'm a fighter, maybe in Bellator or Cage Warriors. I'm up and coming. I don't necessarily feel like I've got the same social media presence as everybody else is out there. Is there almost like an entry point that allows me then to approach a company like yours, because sometimes it can be a bit frightening if you see somebody like yourself working with someone like Francis, for example, and some of the really big names... are you going to take me seriously? How should I approach that?

[Randy at Prolific Media]
Well, listen. We don't care if you have 1000 or eight million followers.

We wanna work with people that are passionate about what they do and that have a sense of pride about how they want to be represented and interpreted and promoted on social/digital media. You know, the companies name is Prolific Media. We take pride in that word 'Prolific'. So, you know, I don't care if you have 1000 or a 1,000,000 if you want to shoot me a DM on Instagram, that's fine. Or Twitter. That's fine. If you want to email me, that's fine. So yeah, either way we don't care. We just want to work for people that are passionate and that have a sense of pride of how they want to be promoted, how they want to be interpreted, how they want to come across. And so I think that's it, I don't think anyone should be afraid or anxious or nervous to reach out, because that's what we're here to do. We're here to help.

[Lee / thisMMAlife]
Understood, so from a commercial perspective, generally, how would that work? You know, because I mean, obviously what I hear a lot with athletes in MMA is when your in the domestic scene and up and coming in general, you're always skint, right? You generally don't have a lot of money until you really break out as a star and then you start getting those big numbers. How would that work? You know, if somebody was a little bit worried about the cost associated with working with your company.

[Randy / Prolific Media]
Right. Well, listen there are different levels and different packages. So, you know, if you just want us to make you some graphics and keep it consistent with the fight graphics or promotion graphics, that's one cost if you want us to post for you every day and come up with the content calendar and pipeline. That's a different thing and I don't think that there isn't a way that we can come to an agreement with someone who's very passionate and wants to be a part of this and wants to do be on this journey together. So I mean, listen, people in this space that know me know my intention here and they know I'm not a salesman. I'm not gonna try to tell you that we're the best or you need to come work with us, my experience speaks for itself. If you understand your value on social and how impactful your voice is and you want to be promoted in a certain way and you want to have a certain look and feel to your brand, your personal brand and you're growing, let's talk and we can make it work. We are flexible, you know,

When you meet an athlete for the first time it's not necessarily just does the athlete wanna work with you, it's whether you want to work with the athlete as well, in terms of that passion, you know, where they see themselves in 2 to 3 years, that self-belief. A lot of the time you know, you can see that sort of stuff right from the beginning, right? Why would we want to put a lot of time and effort into building somebody when they're not gonna post on time or they don't think it's gonna work for them and don't want to engage their audience. It's a lose-lose for both parties, not just us. So, yeah, we want to work with people and be in partnerships with people that are passionate.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
I think one of the things that you mentioned there, which I'll pick up on, which is really important is one of the things I find, is if you reach out to any MMA athletes, you want to interview them or, you know, I found this personally, you want to help them come up with some content and self promote themselves? I've had a lot of negative feedback where I feel I have had to justify myself. You know, it's like I'm not trying to rip anybody off, right? You know, I'm there just so much of it where you don't know if you're going to get mugged off. You don't know if you're going to get ripped off. You don't know if you're gonna get pulled into some ridiculous contracts. You know, everybody to a degree is sceptical and pessimistic on all that type of stuff.

So I think the thing that comes over from speaking to you other than you being a really genuine interesting person is also your heritage and your credibility with the UFC. I think that that's something that really plays into your brand and your organization as you go forward. Because, you know, if that's not a great framework to work from, you know, in terms of having all those those those connections have in, you know, trusted people that you've worked within the past that I don't know what is.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah, listen, I appreciate that and it is very kind of you to say.

There are rules in this industry, right? I mean, we talked about it before we started getting into this interview. This is a very ruthless cut-throat industry to be in, you know, sports business is in general, but definitely MMA more. It's almost like you can't blame athletes for being sceptical or cynical, totally about people reaching out. And like you said, I hope that you know, the athletes I do talk to understand because of my background and what my role was with UFC and how much we grew in that time and the relationships I fostered, they know that my intention is pure and if look, if you don't if we don't want to work together, if we can't come to an agreement, that's fine.

I won't name drop, but I still get texts and phone calls as recently as like last week asking this and that and the other about social. Some of the MMA athletes know I'm not with the UFC anymore, some of them maybe don't. I feel like I foster good relationships. You know me. I left a good taste in people's mouths there. That's why I hope that people who watch this or inquired about Prolific Media know that my intention here is pure.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
The fact that you won't name drop, I'll say, says a lot about you and your company. Just quickly before we wrap it up. What was Dana White like to work with?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]

[pause...] I pause because he's such a polarizing guy, you know, he is so sharp when it comes to business, and that's not always a bad thing, right? I mean, look at what he's done with the UFC and this sport. But he's also shown to be a really nice guy to a lot of different people. Dana White is all about his work but he does have a nice side and a genuine side. Here's the thing about the UFC. I was in meetings and working with Dana White from the time I got hired to the time I left. In what other world does a social media coordinator at any level in any department meet with the president or CEO? So you know, he's very into social media, watches everything. The UFC posts in particular, Dana understands the impact and the importance of it, and so that was cool. Having Dana White in your corner when you're trying to push ideas and stuff across and having someone I can be like, let's try it out. Let's do it, you know, it's pretty cool. Also, there is the reverse of that where he's just like, no, nope that's not going to work for the company. It was definitely interesting to be with someone like Dana White, you kind of learn how to conduct yourself in different ways and in meetings and whatnot. So it was interesting!

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Interesting! It must have been a huge learning curve! I mean, to work alongside somebody like Dana White who is probably one of the most famous people in the whole of mixed martial arts. A lot of people call him the grandfather of MMA, and they don't know to a degree in terms of what he's done for the sport. A businessman within the UFC. Yeah. I mean, he comes across like a machine in terms of the amount of work it puts in.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
He's at the office just like everybody else. Every day. You could say a lot about Dana White, but what you can't stay he that he doesn't bust his ass and work hard. He's 100% every single day. Yeah, 100%.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
And the fact that hey must have seen nearly everything that you did, you know, it must have been quite exposing as well to a degree, right?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yeah but you know, I'm someone that that kind of invites that pressure and likes that pressure. I read this quote, I don't remember who from, but no one built success off never failing. You fail over and over and over and over and over again. And that's how you become successful. There were times I tried to get ideas across and stuff and they were shot down real quick and it turned out it was shot down for the right reason. So, you know, it's a little daunting, I guess, but it's also like it's a learning curve. When you learn what works, you learn about business and then you learn how to present your ideas in certain ways and it was amazing.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
That's why I wanted to bring this up, not the fact that you've just worked with athletes, you've worked continuously with Dana White for a long time and that's really important when it comes to passing down that sort of experience when you work with athletes around their social media and their brand exposure going forwards. Five years is a long time in the UFC, I am sure that whatever you choose to do with your organization going forwards, that experience will just weave its way all the way through it.

Thanks for the time today Randy. We really appreciate you speaking to our community, and I hope they really do get some of this but they reach out to you as well, you know, for anyhow, apart, they wanna you know they want to work with you.

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
I just want to say thank you for the time and the interest and the interview was great. I love what you guys are doing it with an all-inclusive no hate community, it's very much needed in the MMA bubble, so I appreciate it.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
So what's the easiest way for people who read this and what to work with you to reach out?

[Randy @ Prolific Media]
Yep, so you can DM me @prolificmedia or on Twitter @mediaprolific. Or you could reach out to my personal Instagram, which is at @randallanthony_

So you could DM me there personally as well, I'll respond. The company will respond. Just hit us up.

[Lee @ thisMMAlife]
Thank you, Randy! Appreciate it! Take care!

Discussion

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chatenmegan profile image
Megan Chaten

Great to see you on camera finally lee! Great interview, keep doing what you are doing, it is so needed in this sport. x

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Talia Shaw

Great interview. All relevant content!